Monday, October 24, 2016

William Butler Yeats - The Second Coming

       

William Butler Yeats - The Second Coming


Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,

The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.

Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi

Troubles my sight: somewhere in sands of the desert
A shape with lion body and the head of a man,
A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun,
Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
Reel shadows of the indignant desert birds.

The darkness drops again; but now I know
That twenty centuries of stony sleep
Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle,
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?



O segundo Advento - William Butler Yeats (PT)


Girando e girando em voltas mais amplas
O falcão não pode ouvir o falcoeiro;
As coisas se desfazem; não se mantém o centro;
Pura anarquia espalha-se mundo adentro,

A maré obscurecida de sangue se espalha, e em todo lugar
A cerimônia da inocência é afogada;
Aos melhores falta toda convicção, e os piores
Estão cheios de intensidade apaixonada.

Certamente alguma revelação está próxima;
Certamente o Segundo Advento está próximo.
O Segundo Advento! Mal proferidas estas palavras
Quando uma vasta imagem vinda do Spiritus Mundi

Ofusca minha visão: nalgum lugar, nas areias do deserto
Uma forma com corpo de leão e cabeça de homem,
Um olhar fixo e impiedoso como o sol
Está movendo as lentas coxas, enquanto sobre ela
Oscilam sombras de pássaros do deserto indignados.

A escuridão cai novamente; mas agora sei
Que vinte séculos dum sono profundo
Irromperam-se em pesadelo por um berço oscilante.
E a besta fera, sua hora enfim chegada,
Se arrasta até Belém para nascer?

William Butler Yeats ou W.B. Yeats(1865—1939).

Foi um poeta irlandês.

Atuou ativamente no Renascimento Literário Irlandês.






W-S-Gilbert-The-Troubadour

W. S. Gilbert - The Troubadour

A troubadour he played
Without a castle wall,
Within, a hapless maid
Responded to his call.

"Oh, willow, woe is me!
Alack and well-a-day!
If I were only free
I'd hie me far away!"

Unknown her face and name,
But this he knew right well,
The maiden's wailing came
From out a dungeon cell.
Illustration by Gilbert
A hapless woman lay
Within that prison grim--
That fact, I've heard him say,
Was quite enough for him.

"I will not sit or lie,
Or eat or drink, I vow,
Till thou art free as I,
Or I as pent as thou!"

Her tears then ceased to flow,
Her wails no longer rang,
And tuneful in her woe
The prisoned maiden sang:

"Oh, stranger, as you play
I recognise your touch;
And all that I can say,
Is thank you very much!

He seized his clarion straight,
And blew thereat, until
A warder oped the gate,
"Oh, what might be your will?"

"I've come, sir knave, to see
The master of these halls:
A maid unwillingly
Lies prisoned in their walls."

With barely stifled sigh
That porter drooped his head,
With teardrops in his eye,
"A many, sir," he said.

He stayed to hear no more,
But pushed that porter by,
And shortly stood before
SIR HUGH DE PECKHAM RYE.

"What would you, sir, with me?"
The troubadour he downed
Upon his bended knee.

"I've come, DE PECKHAM RYE,
To do a Christian task,
You ask me what would I?
It is not much I ask.

"Release these maidens, sir,
Whom you dominion o'er —
Particularly her
Upon the second floor!

"And if you don't, my lord "
He here stood bolt upright.
And tapped a tailor's sword —
"Come out at once and fight!"

SIR HUGH he called — and ran
The warden from the gate,
"Go, show this gentleman
The maid in forty-eight."

By many a cell they passed
And stopped at length before
A portal, bolted fast:
The man unlocked the door.

He called inside the gate
With coarse and brutal shout,
"Come, step it, forty-eight!"
And forty-eight stepped out.

"They gets it pretty hot,
The maidens wot we cotch —
Two years this lady's got
For collaring a wotch."

"Oh, ah! — indeed — I see,"
The troubadour exclaimed —
"If I may make so free,
How is this castle named?"

The warden's eyelids fill,
And, sighing, he replied,
"Of gloomy Pentonville
This is the Female Side!

The minstrel did not wait
The warden stout to thank,
But recollected straight
He'd business at the Bank.














William-Morris-To-The-Muse-Of-The-North

William Morris - To The Muse Of The North

O muse that swayest the sad Northern Song,
Thy right hand full of smiting & of wrong,
Thy left hand holding pity; & thy breast
Heaving with hope of that so certain rest:
Thou, with the grey eyes kind and unafraid,
The soft lips trembling not, though they have said
The doom of the World and those that dwell therein.
The lips that smile not though thy children win
The fated Love that draws the fated Death.
O, borne adown the fresh stream of thy breath,
Let some word reach my ears and touch my heart,
That, if it may be, I may have a part
In that great sorrow of thy children dead
That vexed the brow, and bowed adown the head,
Whitened the hair, made life a wondrous dream,
And death the murmur of a restful stream,
But left no stain upon those souls of thine
Whose greatness through the tangled world doth shine.
O Mother, and Love and Sister all in one,
Come thou; for sure I am enough alone
That thou thine arms about my heart shouldst throw,
And wrap me in the grief of long ago.

















Henry-Lawson-Till-All-the-Bad-Things-Came-Untrue

Henry Lawson - Till All the Bad Things Came Untrue

BY blacksoil plains burned grey with drought
Where desert shrubs and grasses grow,
Along the Land of Furthest Out
That only Overlanders know.
I dreamed I camped on river grass
In bends where river timber grew—
I dreamed, I dreamed the days to pass
Till all the bad things came untrue.

I dreamed that I was young again,
But was not young as I had been,
My path through life seemed fair and plain,
My sight and hearing clear and keen.
No longer bent nor lined and grey,
I met and loved and worshipped you—
I dreamed, I dreamed the days away
Till all the sad things came untrue.

I dreamed a home of freestone stood
With toned tiled roofs as roofs should be,
By cliff and fall and beach and wood
With wide verandahs to the sea.
I dreamed a hale gudeman and wife,
With sons and daughters well-to-do,
Lived there the glorious old home life
And all the mad things were untrue.

From blacksoil plains burned bare with drought
Where years are sown that never grow—
From dead grey creeks of dreams and drought,
Through black-ridged wastes of weirdest woe,
I tramped and camped with fearsome fare
Until the sea-scape came in view,
And lo! the home lay smiling there
And all the bad things were untrue.













Adam-Lindsay-Gordon-The-Swimmer

Adam Lindsay Gordon - The Swimmer

With short, sharp violent lights made vivid,
To the southward far as the sight can roam,
Only the swirl of the surges livid,
The seas that climb and the surfs that comb,
Only the crag and the cliff to nor'ward,
And rocks receding, and reefs flung forward,
And waifs wreck'd seaward and wasted shoreward
On shallows sheeted with flaming foam.

A grim grey coast and a seaboard ghastly,
And shores trod seldom by feet of men --
Where the batter'd hull and the broken mast lie
They have lain embedded these long years ten.
Love! when we wander'd here together,
Hand in hand through the sparkling weather,
From the heights and hollows of fern and heather,
God surely loved us a little then.

Then skies were fairer and shores were firmer --
The blue sea over the bright sand roll'd;
Babble and prattle, and ripple and murmur,
Sheen of silver and glamour of gold --
And the sunset bath'd in the gulf to lend her
A garland of pinks and of purples tender,
A tinge of the sun-god's rosy splendour,
A tithe of his glories manifold.

Man's works are craven, cunning, and skillful
On earth where his tabernacles are;
But the sea is wanton, the sea is wilful,
And who shall mend her and who shall mar?
Shall we carve success or record disaster
On her bosom of heaving alabaster?
Will her purple pulse beat fainter or faster
For fallen sparrow or fallen star?

I would that with sleepy soft embraces
The sea would fold me -- would find me rest
In luminous shades of her secret places,
In depths where her marvels are manifest,
So the earth beneath her should not discover
My hidden couch -- nor the heaven above her --
As a strong love shielding a weary lover,
I would have her shield me with shining breast.

When light in the realms of space lay hidden,
When life was yet in the womb of time,
Ere flesh was fettered to fruits forbidden,
And souls were wedded to care and crime,
Was the course foreshaped for the future spirit --
A burden of folly, a void of merit --
That would fain the wisdom of stars inherit,
And cannot fathom the seas sublime?

Under the sea or the soil (what matter?
The sea and the soil are under the sun),
As in the former days in the latter
The sleeping or waking is known of none,
Surely the sleeper shall not awaken
To griefs forgotten or joys forsaken,
For the price of all things given and taken,
The sum of all things done and undone.

Shall we count offences or coin excuses,
Or weigh with scales the soul of a man,
Whom a strong hand binds and a sure hand looses,
Whose light is a spark and his life a span?
The seed he sowed or the soil he cumber'd,
The time he served or the space he slumber'd,
Will it profit a man when his days are number'd,
Or his deeds since the days of his life began?

One, glad because of the light, saith, "Shall not
The righteous judges of all the earth do right,
For behold the sparrows on the house-tops fall not
Save as seemeth to Him good in His sight?"
And this man's joy shall have no abiding
Through lights departing and lives dividing,
He is soon as one in the darkness hiding,
One loving darkness rather than light.

A little season of love and laughter,
Of light and life, and pleasure and pain,
And a horror of outer darkness after,
And dust returneth to dust again;
Then the lesser life shall be as the greater,
And the lover of light shall join the hater,
And the one thing cometh sooner or later,
And no one knoweth the loss or gain.

Love of my life! we had lights in season --
Hard to part with, harder to keep --
We had strength to labour and souls to reason,
And seed to scatter and fruits to reap.
Though time estranges and fate disperses,
We have had our loves and loving mercies.
Though the gifts of the light in the end are curses,
Yet bides the gift of darkness -- sleep!

See! girt with tempest and wing'd with thunder,
And clad with lightning and shod with sleet,
The strong winds treading the swift waves sunder
The flying rollers with frothy feet.
One gleam like a bloodshot swordblade swims on
The skyline, staining the green gulf crimson
A death stroke fiercely dealt by a dim sun
That strikes through his stormy winding sheet.

Oh, brave white horses! you gather and gallop,
The storm sprite loosens the gusty reins;
Now the stoutest ship were the frailest shallop
In your hollow backs, or your high arch'd manes.
I would ride as never a man has ridden
In your sleepy swirling surges hidden,
To gulfs foreshadow'd, through straits forbidden,
Where no light wearies and no love wanes.
















Laurence-Hope-Story-by-Lalla-ji-the-Priest

Laurence Hope - Story by Lalla-ji, the Priest

He loved the Plant with a keen delight,
A passionate fervour, strange to see,
Tended it ardently, day and night,
Yet never a flower lit up the tree.

The leaves were succulent, thick, and green,
And, sessile, out of the snakelike stem
Rose spine-like fingers, alert and keen,
To catch at aught that molested them.

But though they nurtured it day and night,
With love and labour, the child and he
Were never granted the longed-for sight
Of a flower crowning the twisted tree.

Until one evening a wayworn Priest
Stopped for the night in the Temple shade
And shared the fare of their simple feast
Under the vines and the jasmin laid.

He, later, wandering round the flowers
Paused awhile by the blossomless tree.
The man said, 'May it be fault of ours,
That never its buds my eyes may see?

'Aslip it came from the further East
Many a sunlit summer ago.'
'It grows in our Jungles,' said the Priest,
'Men see it rarely; but this I know,

'The Jungle people worship it; say
They bury a child around its roots--
Bury it living:--the only way
To crimson glory of flowers and fruits.'

He spoke in whispers; his furtive glance
Probing the depths of the garden shade.
The man came closer, with eyes askance,
The child beside them shivered, afraid.

A cold wind drifted about the three,
Jarring the spines with a hungry sound,
The spines that grew on the snakelike tree
And guarded its roots beneath the ground.

. . . . . .

After the fall of the summer rain
The plant was glorious, redly gay,
Blood-red with blossom. Never again
Men saw the child in the Temple play.






















Sidney-Lanier-Song-of-the-Chattahoochee

Sidney Lanier - Song of the Chattahoochee

Out of the hills of Habersham,
Down the valleys of Hall,
I hurry amain to reach the plain,
Run the rapid and leap the fall,
Split at the rock and together again,
Accept my bed, or narrow or wide,
And flee from folly on every side
With a lover’s pain to attain the plain
Far from the hills of Habersham,
Far from the valleys of Hall.

All down the hills of Habersham,
All through the valleys of Hall,
The rushes cried ‘Abide, abide,'
The willful waterweeds held me thrall,
The laving laurel turned my tide,
The ferns and the fondling grass said ‘Stay,'
The dewberry dipped for to work delay,
And the little reeds sighed ‘Abide, abide,
Here in the hills of Habersham,
Here in the valleys of Hall.'

High o’er the hills of Habersham,
Veiling the valleys of Hall,
The hickory told me manifold
Fair tales of shade, the poplar tall
Wrought me her shadowy self to hold,
The chestnut, the oak, the walnut, the pine,
Overleaning, with flickering meaning and sign,
Said, ‘Pass not, so cold, these manifold
Deep shades of the hills of Habersham,
These glades in the valleys of Hall.'

And oft in the hills of Habersham,
And oft in the valleys of Hall,
The white quartz shone, and the smooth brook-stone
Did bar me of passage with friendly brawl,
And many a luminous jewel lone
-- Crystals clear or a-cloud with mist,
Ruby, garnet and amethyst --
Made lures with the lights of streaming stone
In the clefts of the hills of Habersham,
In the beds of the valleys of Hall.

But oh, not the hills of Habersham,
And oh, not the valleys of Hall
Avail: I am fain for to water the plain.
Downward the voices of Duty call --
Downward, to toil and be mixed with the main,
The dry fields burn, and the mills are to turn,
And a myriad flowers mortally yearn,
And the lordly main from beyond the plain
Calls o’er the hills of Habersham,
Calls through the valleys of Hall.



















Thomas-Moore-Song

Thomas Moore - Song

Away with this pouting and sadness,

Sweet Girl, will you never give o'er ?
I love you by Heaven, to madness.
And what can I swear to you more ?
Believe not the Old Woman's fable,
That oaths are as short as a kiss.
U love you as long as I am able.
And swear for no longer than Hus.

Come waste not the time in professions,
For not to be bleat when we can
Is one of the darkest transgressions
That happen ^twixt Woman and Man ;
Pretty Moralist! why thus.be^nning,
My innocent warmth to reprove ?
Heaven knows that I never lov^d iBinning,
Except little sinninga in love :
If swearing, however, will do it.
Come bring me the calendar pray,
I voW by that Lip-^I'll go through it,
And not miss a Saint on my way ;
The Angels abell help me to wheedle, .
I'll swear upon every one
That e'er danced on the point of a needle,
Or rode on the beam of the sun :
Oh why should Platonic control, love,
Enchain an emotion so free ?
Your Soul, the' a very sweet Soul, love,
Will n^'er be sufficient for me ;
If you think by this coldness and scorniog,
To seem more angelic and bright.
Be an Angel, my love, in the morning,
But oh ! be Woman at night.



















Bai-Li-The-River-Merchants-Wife

Bai Li 李白 - The River Merchant's Wife: A Letter

While my hair was still cut straight across my forehead
I played about the front gate, pulling flowers.
You came by on bamboo stilts, playing horse,
You walked about my seat, playing with blue plums.
And we went on living in the village of Chōkan:
Two small people, without dislike or suspicion.
At fourteen I married My Lord you.
I never laughed, being bashful.
Lowering my head, I looked at the wall.
Called to, a thousand times, I never looked back.

At fifteen I stopped scowling,
I desired my dust to be mingled with yours
Forever and forever, and forever.
Why should I climb the look out?

At sixteen you departed
You went into far Ku-tō-en, by the river of swirling eddies,
And you have been gone five months.
The monkeys make sorrowful noise overhead.

You dragged your feet when you went out.
By the gate now, the moss is grown, the different mosses,
Too deep to clear them away!
The leaves fall early this autumn, in wind.
The paired butterflies are already yellow with August
Over the grass in the West garden;
They hurt me.
I grow older.
If you are coming down through the narrows of the river Kiang,
Please let me know beforehand,
And I will come out to meet you
As far as Chō-fū-Sa.



















Laurence-Hope-Reminiscence-of-Mahomed-Akram

Laurence Hope - Reminiscence of Mahomed Akram

I SHALL never forget you, never. Never escape
Your memory woven about the beautiful things of life.
The sudden Thought of your Face is like a Wound
When it comes unsought
On some scent of Jasmin, Lilies, or pale Tuberose,
Any one of the sweet white fragrant flowers,
Flowers I used to love and lay in your hair.

Sunset is terribly sad. I saw you stand
Tall against the red and the gold like a slender palm;
The light wind stirred your hair as you waved your hand,
Waved farewell, as ever, serene and calm,
To me, the passion-wearied and tost and torn,
Riding down the road in the gathering grey.
Since that day
The sunset red is empty, the gold forlorn.

Often across the Banqueting board at nights
Men linger about your name in careless praise--
The name that cuts deep into my soul like a knife;
And the gay guest-faces and flowers and leaves and lights
Fade away from the failing sense in a haze,
And the music sways
Far away in unmeasured distance. . . .

I cannot forget--
I cannot escape. What are the Stars to me?
Stars that meant so much, too much, in my youth;
Stars that sparkled about your eyes,
Made a radiance round your hair,
What are they now?

Lingering lights of a Finished Feast,
Little lingering sparks rather,
Of a Light that is long gone out.






















Percy-Bysshe-Shelley-Ozymandias-of-Egypt

Percy Bysshe Shelley - Ozymandias of Egypt

I met a traveller from an antique land,
Who said—“Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. . . . Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed;
And on the pedestal, these words appear:
My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings;
Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.”















Andrew-Barton-Paterson-The-Open-Steeplechase

Andrew Barton Paterson - The Open Steeplechase

I had ridden over hurdles up the country once or twice,
By the side of Snowy River with a horse they called 'The Ace'.
And we brought him down to Sydney, and our rider, Jimmy Rice,
Got a fall and broke his shoulder, so they nabbed me in a trice,
Me, that never wore the colours, for the open Steeplechase.

'Make the running,' said the trainer, 'it's your only chance whatever,
Make it hot from start to finish, for the old black horse can stay,
And just think of how they'll take it, when they hear on Snowy River
That the country boy was plucky, and the country horse was clever.
You must ride for old Monaro and the mountain boys today.'

'Are you ready? said the starter, as we held the horses back.
All ablazing with impatience, with excitement all aglow;
Before us like a ribbon stretched the steeplechasing track,
And the sun-rays glistened brightly on the chestnut and the black
As the starter's words came slowly, 'Are, you, ready? Go!'

Well I scarcely knew we'd started, I was stupid-like with wonder
Till the field closed up beside me and a jump appeared ahead.
And we flew it like a hurdle, not a baulk and not a blunder,
As we charged it all together, and it fairly whistled under,
And then some were pulled behind me and a few shot out and led.

So we ran for half the distance, and I'm making no pretenses
When I tell you I was feeling very nervous-like and queer,
For those jockeys rode like demons; you would think they'd lost their senses
If you saw them rush their horses at those rasping five-foot fences,
And in place of making running I was falling to the rear.

Till a chap came racing past me on a horse the called 'The Quiver',
And said he, 'My country joker, are you going to give it best?
Are you frightened of the fences? does their stoutness make you shiver?
Have they come to breeding cowards by the side of Snowy River?
Are there riders in Monaro?, 'but I never heard the rest.

For I drove The Ace and sent him just as fast as he could pace it
At the big black line of timber stretching fair across the track,
And he shot beside The Quiver. 'Now,' said I, 'my boy, we'll race it.
You can come with Snowy River if you're only game to face it,
Let us mend the pace a little and we'll see who cries a crack.'

So we raced away together, and we left the others standing,
And the people cheered and shouted as we settled down to ride,
And we clung beside The Quiver. At his taking off and landing
I could see his scarlet nostril and his mighty ribs expanding,
And The Ace stretched out in earnest, and we held him stride for stride.

But the pace was so terrific that they soon ran out their tether,
They were rolling in their gallop, they were fairly blown and beat,
But they both were game as pebbles, neither one would show the feather.
And we rushed them at the fences, and they cleared them both together,
Nearly every time they clouted, but they somehow kept their feet.

Then the last jump rose before us, and they faced it game as ever,
We were both at spur and whipcord, fetching blood at every bound,
And above the people's cheering and the cries of 'Ace' and 'Quiver',
I could hear the trainer shouting, 'One more run for Snowy River.'
Then we struck the jump together and came smashing to the ground.

Well, The Quiver ran to blazes, but The Ace stood still and waited,
Stood and waited like a statue while I scrambled on its back.
There was no one next or near me for the field was fairly slated,
So I cantered home a winner with my shoulder dislocated,
While the man who rode The Quiver followed limping down the track.

And he shook my hand and told me that in all his days he never
Met a man who rode more gamely, and our last set-to was prime.
Then we wired them on Monaro how we chanced to beat The Quiver,
And they sent us back an answer, 'Good old sort from Snowy River:
Send us word each race you start in and we'll back you every time.'
































Quintus Horatius Flaccus (Horace) - Ode 1.5 (Quis Multa Gracilis)

Horace-Quis-Multa-Gracilis

Horace - Quis Multa Gracilis

What slender boy drenched in liquid perfumes
presses upon you many roses,
Pyrrha, under a pleasing cave?
For whom do you tie your yellow hair,

simple with elegance? Alas, how often he will
lament faithlessness and changed gods and he will
marvel in surprise at the rough sea with
black winds

he who now enjoys you, trusting, you are golden,
he who hopes that you will always be free, always lovable,
unaware of a treacherous breeze.
Wretched ones, for whom

you, untried, shine. The sacred wall with the
votive tablet indicates that I have suspended
my wet clothes to the
god of the sea.


Quis multa gracilis te puer in rosa
perfusus liquidis urget odoribus
grato, Pyrrha, sub antro?
Cui flavam religas comam,

simplex munditiis? Heu quotiens fidem
mutatosque deos flebit et aspera
nigris aequora ventis
emirabitur insolens

qui nunc te fruitur credulus aurea,
qui semper vacuam, semper amabilem
sperat, nescius aurae
fallacis. Miseri, quibus

intemptata nites. Me tabula sacer
votiva paries indicat uvida
suspendisse potenti
vestimenta maris deo.













William-Collins-Ode-to-Evening

William Collins - Ode to Evening

If aught of oaten stop, or past'ral song,
May hope, chaste Eve, to soothe thy modest ear,
Like thy own solemn springs,
Thy springs and dying gales,
O nymph reserved, while now the bright-haired sun
Sits in yon western tent, whose cloudy skirts,
With brede ethereal wove,
O'erhang his wavy bed;
Now air is hushed, save where the weak-ey'd bat
With short shrill shriek flits by on leathern wing,
Or where the beetle winds
His small but sullen horn
As oft he rises 'midst the twilight path
Against the pilgrim, borne in heedless hum:
Now teach me, maid composed,
To breathe some softened strain,
Whose numbers stealing through thy dark'ning vale
May not unseemly with its stillness suit,
As musing slow, I hail
Thy genial loved return.
For when thy folding star arising shows
His paly circlet, at his warning lamp
The fragrant Hours, and elves
Who slept in flowers the day,
And many a nymph who wreathes her brows with sedge
And sheds the fresh'ning dew, and lovelier still,
The pensive pleasures sweet
Prepare thy shad'wy car.
Then lead, calm votress, where some sheety lake
Cheers the lone heath, or some time-hallowed pile
Or upland fallows grey
Reflect its last cool gleam.
But when chill blust'ring winds, or driving rain,
Forbid my willing feet, be mine the hut
That from the mountain's side
Views wilds, and swelling floods,
And hamlets brown, and dim-discovered spires,
And hears their simple bell, and marks o'er all
Thy dewy fingers draw
The gradual dusky veil.

While Spring shall pour his showers, as oft he wont,
And bathe thy breathing tresses, meekest Eve;
While Summer loves to sport
Beneath thy ling'ring light;
While sallow Autumn fills thy lap with leaves;
Or Winter, yelling through the troublous air,
Affrights thy shrinking train
And rudely rends thy robes;
So long, sure-found beneath the sylvan shed,
Shall Fancy, Friendship, Science, rose-lipp'd Health,
Thy gentlest influence own,
And hymn thy fav'rite name!
























William-Morris-No-Master

William Morris - No Master

Saith man to man, We've heard and known
That we no master need
To live upon this earth, our own,
In fair and manly deed.
The grief of slaves long passed away
For us hath forged the chain,
Till now each worker's patient day
Builds up the House of Pain.
And we, shall we too, crouch and quail,
Ashamed, afraid of strife,
And lest our lives untimely fail
Embrace the Death in Life?
Nay, cry aloud, and have no fear,
We few against the world;
Awake, arise! the hope we bear
Against the curse is hurled.
It grows and grows--are we the same,
The feeble band, the few?
Or what are these with eyes aflame,
And hands to deal and do?
This is the host that bears the word,
No MASTER HIGH OR LOW -
A lightning flame, a shearing sword,
A storm to overthrow.



















Lola-Ridge-New-Orleans

Lola Ridge - New Orleans

Do you remember
Honey-melon moon
Dripping thick sweet light
Where Canal Street saunters off by herself among quiet trees?
And the faint decayed patchouli—
Fragrance of New Orleans
Like a dead tube rose
Upheld in the warm air…
Miraculously whole.















Laurence-Hope-Marriage-Thoughts-By-Morsellin-Khan


Laurence Hope - Marriage Thoughts: By Morsellin Khan

_Bridegroom_
I give you my house and my lands, all golden with harvest;
My sword, my shield, and my jewels, the spoils of my strife,
My strength and my dreams, and aught I have gathered of glory,
And to-night--to-night, I shall give you my very life.

_Bride_
I may not raise my eyes, O my Lord, towards you,
And I may not speak: what matter? my voice would fail.
But through my dowacast lashes, feeling your beauty,
I shiver and burn with pleasure beneath my veil.

_Younger Sisters_
We throw sweet perfume upon her head,
And delicate flowers round her bed.
Ah, would that it were our turn to wed!

_Mother_
I see my daughter, vaguely, through my tears,
(Ah, lost caresses of my early years!)
I see the bridegroom, King of men in truth!
(Ah, my first lover, and my vanished youth!)

_Bride_
Almost I dread this night. My senses fail me.
How shall I dare to clasp a thing so dear?
Many have feared your name, but I your beauty.
Lord of my life, be gentle to my fear!

_Younger Sisters_
In the softest silk is our sister dressed,
With silver rubies upon her breast,
Where a dearer treasure to-night will rest.

_Dancing Girls_
See! his hair is like silk, and his teeth are whiter
Than whitest of jasmin flowers. Pity they marry him thus.
I would change my jewels against his caresses.
Verily, sisters, this marriage is greatly a loss to us!

_Bride_
Would that the music ceased and the night drew round us,
With solitude, shadow, and sound of closing doors,
So that our lips might meet and our beings mingle,
While mine drank deep of the essence, beloved, of yours.

_Passing mendicant_
Out of the joy of your marriage feast,
Oh, brothers, be good to me.
The way is long and the Shrine is far,
Where my weary feet would be.

And feasting is always somewhat sad
To those outside the door--
Still; Love is only a dream, and Life
Itself is hardly more!










Sir-Walter-Scott-Lochinvar

Sir Walter Scott - Lochinvar

O young Lochinvar is come out of the west,
Through all the wide Border his steed was the best;
And save his good broadsword he weapons had none,
He rode all unarm’d, and he rode all alone.
So faithful in love, and so dauntless in war,
There never was knight like the young Lochinvar.

He staid not for brake, and he stopp’d not for stone,
He swam the Eske river where ford there was none;
But ere he alighted at Netherby gate,
The bride had consented, the gallant came late:
For a laggard in love, and a dastard in war,
Was to wed the fair Ellen of brave Lochinvar.

So boldly he enter’d the Netherby Hall,
Among bride’s-men, and kinsmen, and brothers and all:
Then spoke the bride’s father, his hand on his sword,
(For the poor craven bridegroom said never a word,)
“O come ye in peace here, or come ye in war,
Or to dance at our bridal, young Lord Lochinvar?”

“I long woo’d your daughter, my suit you denied;—
Love swells like the Solway, but ebbs like its tide—
And now I am come, with this lost love of mine,
To lead but one measure, drink one cup of wine.
There are maidens in Scotland more lovely by far,
That would gladly be bride to the young Lochinvar.”

The bride kiss’d the goblet: the knight took it up,
He quaff’d off the wine, and he threw down the cup.
She look’d down to blush, and she look’d up to sigh,
With a smile on her lips and a tear in her eye.
He took her soft hand, ere her mother could bar,—
“Now tread we a measure!” said young Lochinvar.

So stately his form, and so lovely her face,
That never a hall such a galliard did grace;
While her mother did fret, and her father did fume,
And the bridegroom stood dangling his bonnet and plume;
And the bride-maidens whisper’d, “’twere better by far
To have match’d our fair cousin with young Lochinvar.”

One touch to her hand, and one word in her ear,
When they reach’d the hall-door, and the charger stood near;
So light to the croupe the fair lady he swung,
So light to the saddle before her he sprung!
“She is won! we are gone, over bank, bush, and scaur;
They’ll have fleet steeds that follow,” quoth young Lochinvar.

There was mounting ’mong Graemes of the Netherby clan;
Forsters, Fenwicks, and Musgraves, they rode and they ran:
There was racing and chasing on Cannobie Lee,
But the lost bride of Netherby ne’er did they see.
So daring in love, and so dauntless in war,
Have ye e’er heard of gallant like young Lochinvar?
















David-Garrick-Kitty-a-fair-but-frozen-maid

David Garrick - Kitty, a fair but frozen maid

Kitty, a fair, but frozen maid,
Kindled a flame I still deplore;
The hood-wink'd boy I call'd in aid,
Much of his near approach afraid,
So fatal to my suit before.
At length, propitious to my pray'r,
The little urchin came;
At once he sought the midway air,
And soon he clear'd, with dextrous care,
The bitter relicks of my flame.
To Kitty, Fanny now succeeds,
She kindles slow, but lasting fires:
With care my appetite she feeds;
Each day some willing victim bleeds,
To satisfy my strange desires.
Say, by what title, or what name,
Must I this youth address?
Cupid and he are not the same,
Tho' both can raise, or quench a flame --
I'll kiss you, if you guess.

















Robert-Graves-In-the-Wilderness

Robert Graves - In the Wilderness

Christ of His gentleness
Thirsting and hungering,
Walked in the wilderness;
Soft words of grace He spoke
Unto lost desert-folk
That listened wondering.
He heard the bitterns call
From ruined palace-wall,
Answered them brotherly.
He held communion
With the she-pelican
Of lonely piety.
Basilisk, cockatrice,
Flocked to his homilies,
With mail of dread device,
With monstrous barbéd slings,
With eager dragon-eyes;
Great rats on leather wings
And poor blind broken things,
Foul in their miseries.
And ever with Him went,
Of all His wanderings
Comrade, with ragged coat,
Gaunt ribs—poor innocent—
Bleeding foot, burning throat,
The guileless old scapegoat;
For forty nights and days
Followed in Jesus’ ways,
Sure guard behind Him kept,
Tears like a lover wept.









Phillis-Wheatley-An-Hymn-to-Humanity

Phillis Wheatley - An Hymn to Humanity

I.

Lo! for this dark terrestrial ball
Forsakes his azure-paved hall
A prince of heav'nly birth!
Divine Humanity behold,
What wonders rise, what charms unfold
At his descent to earth!

II.

The bosoms of the great and good
With wonder and delight he view'd,
And fix'd his empire there:
Him, close compressing to his breast,
The sire of gods and men address'd,
"My son, my heav'nly fair!

III.

"Descend to earth, there place thy throne;
"To succour man's afflicted son
"Each human heart inspire:
"To act in bounties unconfin'd
"Enlarge the close contracted mind,
"And fill it with thy fire."

IV.

Quick as the word, with swift career
He wings his course from star to star,
And leaves the bright abode.
The Virtue did his charms impart;
Their G-----! then thy raptur'd heart
Perceiv'd the rushing God:

V.

For when thy pitying eye did see
The languid muse in low degree,
Then, then at thy desire
Descended the celestial nine;
O'er me methought they deign'd to shine,
And deign'd to string my lyre.

VI.

Can Afric's muse forgetful prove?
Or can such friendship fail to move
A tender human heart?
Immortal Friendship laurel-crown'd
The smiling Graces all surround
With ev'ry heav'nly Art.





















Francis-Thompson-The-Hound-of-Heaven

Francis Thompson - The Hound of Heaven

I fled Him, down the nights and down the days;
   I fled Him, down the arches of the years;
I fled Him, down the labyrinthine ways
   Of my own mind; and in the midst of tears
I hid from Him, and under running laughter.
             Up vistaed hopes I sped;
             And shot, precipitated,
Adown Titanic glooms of chasmed fears,
   From those strong Feet that followed, followed after.
             But with unhurrying chase,
             And unperturbèd pace,
     Deliberate speed, majestic instancy,
             They beat—and a Voice beat
             More instant than the Feet—
     'All things betray thee, who betrayest Me'.
             I pleaded, outlaw-wise,
By many a hearted casement, curtained red,
   Trellised with intertwining charities;
(For, though I knew His love Who followed,
             Yet was I sore adread
Lest, having Him, I must have naught beside.)
But, if one little casement parted wide,
   The gust of His approach would clash it to:
   Fear wist not to evade, as Love wist to pursue.
Across the margent of the world I fled,
   And troubled the gold gateway of the stars,
   Smiting for shelter on their clanged bars;
             Fretted to dulcet jars
And silvern chatter the pale ports o' the moon.
I said to Dawn: Be sudden—to Eve: Be soon;
   With thy young skiey blossom heap me over
             From this tremendous Lover—
Float thy vague veil about me, lest He see!
   I tempted all His servitors, but to find
My own betrayal in their constancy,
In faith to Him their fickleness to me,
   Their traitorous trueness, and their loyal deceit.
To all swift things for swiftness did I sue;
   Clung to the whistling mane of every wind.
          But whether they swept, smoothly fleet,
     The long savannahs of the blue;
            Or, whether, Thunder-driven,
          They clanged his chariot 'thwart a heaven,
Plashy with flying lightnings round the spurn o' their feet:—
   Fear wist not to evade as Love wist to pursue.
             Still with unhurrying chase,
             And unperturbed pace,
      Deliberate speed, majestic instancy,
             Came on the following Feet,
             And a Voice above their beat—
'Naught shelters thee, who wilt not shelter Me.'

I sought no more after that which I strayed
          In face of man or maid;
But still within the little children's eyes
          Seems something, something that replies,
They at least are for me, surely for me!
I turned me to them very wistfully;
But just as their young eyes grew sudden fair
         With dawning answers there,
Their angel plucked them from me by the hair.
Come then, ye other children, Nature's—share
With me’ (said I) 'your delicate fellowship;
          Let me greet you lip to lip,
          Let me twine with you caresses,
              Wantoning
          With our Lady-Mother's vagrant tresses,
             Banqueting
          With her in her wind-walled palace,
          Underneath her azured dais,
          Quaffing, as your taintless way is,
             From a chalice
Lucent-weeping out of the dayspring.’
             So it was done:
I in their delicate fellowship was one—
Drew the bolt of Nature's secrecies.
          I knew all the swift importings
          On the wilful face of skies;
           I knew how the clouds arise
          Spumèd of the wild sea-snortings;
             All that's born or dies
          Rose and drooped with; made them shapers
Of mine own moods, or wailful divine;
          With them joyed and was bereaven.
          I was heavy with the even,
          When she lit her glimmering tapers
          Round the day's dead sanctities.
          I laughed in the morning's eyes.
I triumphed and I saddened with all weather,
          Heaven and I wept together,
And its sweet tears were salt with mortal mine:
Against the red throb of its sunset-heart
          I laid my own to beat,
          And share commingling heat;
But not by that, by that, was eased my human smart.
In vain my tears were wet on Heaven's grey cheek.
For ah! we know not what each other says,
          These things and I; in sound I speak—
Their sound is but their stir, they speak by silences.
Nature, poor stepdame, cannot slake my drouth;
          Let her, if she would owe me,
Drop yon blue bosom-veil of sky, and show me
          The breasts o’ her tenderness:
Never did any milk of hers once bless
             My thirsting mouth.
             Nigh and nigh draws the chase,
             With unperturbed pace,
Deliberate speed, majestic instancy;
             And past those noisèd Feet
             A voice comes yet more fleet—
          'Lo! naught contents thee, who content'st not Me.'

Naked I wait Thy love's uplifted stroke!
My harness piece by piece Thou has hewn from me,
             And smitten me to my knee;
          I am defenceless utterly.
          I slept, methinks, and woke,
And, slowly gazing, find me stripped in sleep.
In the rash lustihead of my young powers,
          I shook the pillaring hours
And pulled my life upon me; grimed with smears,
I stand amidst the dust o' the mounded years—
My mangled youth lies dead beneath the heap.
My days have crackled and gone up in smoke,
Have puffed and burst as sun-starts on a stream.
          Yea, faileth now even dream
The dreamer, and the lute the lutanist;
Even the linked fantasies, in whose blossomy twist
I swung the earth a trinket at my wrist,
Are yielding; cords of all too weak account
For earth with heavy griefs so overplussed.
          Ah! is Thy love indeed
A weed, albeit an amarinthine weed,
Suffering no flowers except its own to mount?
          Ah! must—
          Designer infinite!—
Ah! must Thou char the wood ere Thou canst limn with it?
My freshness spent its wavering shower i' the dust;
And now my heart is as a broken fount,
Wherein tear-drippings stagnate, spilt down ever
          From the dank thoughts that shiver
Upon the sighful branches of my mind.
          Such is; what is to be?
The pulp so bitter, how shall taste the rind?
I dimly guess what Time in mists confounds;
Yet ever and anon a trumpet sounds
From the hid battlements of Eternity;
Those shaken mists a space unsettle, then
Round the half-glimpsed turrets slowly wash again.
          But not ere him who summoneth
          I first have seen, enwound
With glooming robes purpureal, cypress-crowned;
His name I know and what his trumpet saith.
Whether man's heart or life it be which yields
          Thee harvest, must Thy harvest-fields
          Be dunged with rotten death?

             Now of that long pursuit
             Comes on at hand the bruit;
          That Voice is round me like a bursting sea:
          'And is thy earth so marred,
          Shattered in shard on shard?
          Lo, all things fly thee, for thou fliest Me!

          'Strange, piteous, futile thing!
Wherefore should any set thee love apart?
Seeing none but I makes much of naught' (He said),
'And human love needs human meriting:
          How hast thou merited—
Of all man's clotted clay the dingiest clot?
          Alack, thou knowest not
How little worthy of any love thou art!
Whom wilt thou find to love ignoble thee,
          Save Me, save only Me?
All which I took from thee I did but take,
          Not for thy harms,
But just that thou might'st seek it in My arms.
          All which thy child's mistake
Fancies as lost, I have stored for thee at home:
          Rise, clasp My hand, and come!'

   Halts by me that footfall:
   Is my gloom, after all,
Shade of His hand, outstretched caressingly?
   'Ah, fondest, blindest, weakest,
   I am He Whom thou seekest!
Thou dravest love from thee, who dravest Me.'

















































Fulke-Greville-Fie-Foolish-Earth

Fulke Greville - Fie, Foolish Earth

Fie, foolish earth, think you the heaven wants glory
Because your shadows do yourself benight?
All's dark unto the blind, let them be sorry;
But love still in herself finds her delight.
Fie, fond desire, think you that love wants glory
Because your shadows do yourself benight?
The hopes and fears of lust may make men sorry,
The heavens in themselves are ever bright.
Then earth, stand fast, the sky that you benight
Will turn again and so restore your glory;
Desire, be steady, hope is your delight,
An orb wherein no creature can be sorry,
Love being placed above these middle regions
Where every passion wars itself with legions.













John-B-Tabb-Fascination

John B. Tabb - Fascination

 Among your many playmates here,
    How is it that you all prefer
      Your little friend, my dear?
    "Because, mamma, tho' hard we try,
    Not one of us can spit so high,
      And catch it in his ear."













William-Morris-The-Day-Of-Days

William Morris - The Day Of Days

Each eve earth falleth down the dark,
As though its hope were o'er;
Yet lurks the sun when day is done
Behind to-morrow's door.
Grey grows the dawn while men-folk sleep,
Unseen spreads on the light,
Till the thrush sings to the coloured things,
And earth forgets the night.
No otherwise wends on our Hope:
E'en as a tale that's told
Are fair lives lost, and all the cost
Of wise and true and bold.
We've toiled and failed; we spake the word;
None hearkened; dumb we lie;
Our Hope is dead, the seed we spread
Fell o'er the earth to die.
What's this? For joy our hearts stand still,
And life is loved and dear,
The lost and found the Cause hath crowned,
The Day of Days is here.

















Thomas-Hardy-The-Coming-of-the-End

Thomas Hardy - The Coming of the End

How it came to an end!
The meeting afar from the crowd,
And the love-looks and laughters unpenned,
The parting when much was avowed,
How it came to an end!

It came to an end;
Yes, the outgazing over the stream,
With the sun on each serpentine bend,
Or, later, the luring moon-gleam;
It came to an end.

It came to an end,
The housebuilding, furnishing, planting,
As if there were ages to spend
In welcoming, feasting, and jaunting;
It came to an end.

It came to an end,
That journey of one day a week:
("It always goes on," said a friend,
"Just the same in bright weathers or bleak;")
But it came to an end.

"HOW will come to an end
This orbit so smoothly begun,
Unless some convulsion attend?"
I often said. "What will be done
When it comes to an end?"

Well, it came to an end
Quite silently - stopped without jerk;
Better close no prevision could lend;
Working out as One planned it should work
Ere it came to an end.










Robert-Herrick-The-Cheat-of-Cupid

Robert Herrick - The Cheat of Cupid. Or, The Ungentle Guest


ONE silent night of late,
    When every creature rested,
Came one unto my gate
    And, knocking, me molested.

Who's that, said I, beats there,
    And troubles thus the sleepy?
Cast off, said he, all fear,
    And let not locks thus keep ye.

For I a boy am, who
    By moonless nights have swerved ;
And all with show'rs wet through,
    And e'en with cold half starved.

I pitiful arose,
    And soon a taper lighted ;
And did myself disclose
    Unto the lad benighted.

I saw he had a bow
    And wings, too, which did shiver ;
And, looking down below,
    I spied he had a quiver.

I to my chimney's shine
    Brought him, as love professes,
And chafed his hands with mine,
    And dried his drooping tresses.
But when he felt him warm'd :
Let's try this bow of ours,
And string, if they be harm'd,
    Said he, with these late showers.

Forthwith his bow he bent,
    And wedded string and arrow,
And struck me, that it went
    Quite through my heart and marrow.

Then, laughing loud, he flew
    Away, and thus said, flying :
Adieu, mine host, adieu,
    I'll leave thy heart a-dying.









Thomas-Hardy-Afterwards

Thomas Hardy - Afterwards

When the Present has latched its postern behind my tremulous stay,
And the May month flaps its glad green leaves like wings,
Delicate-filmed as new-spun silk, will the neighbours say,
'He was a man who used to notice such things'?

If it be in the dusk when, like an eyelid's soundless blink,
The dewfall-hawk comes crossing the shades to alight
Upon the wind-warped upland thorn, a gazer may think,
'To him this must have been a familiar sight.'

If I pass during some nocturnal blackness, mothy and warm,
When the hedgehog travels furtively over the lawn,
One may say, 'He strove that such innocent creatures should come to no harm,
But he could do little for them; and now he is gone.'

If, when hearing that I have been stilled at last, they stand at the door,
Watching the full-starred heavens that winter sees
Will this thought rise on those who will meet my face no more,
'He was one who had an eye for such mysteries'?

And will any say when my bell of quittance is heard in the gloom
And a crossing breeze cuts a pause in its outrollings,
Till they rise again, as they were a new bell's boom,
'He hears it not now, but used to notice such things'?














Amy-Lowell-Absence

Amy Lowell - Absence

My cup is empty to-night,
Cold and dry are its sides,
Chilled by the wind from the open window.
Empty and void, it sparkles white in the moonlight.
The room is filled with the strange scent
Of wistaria blossoms.
They sway in the moon's radiance
And tap against the wall.
But the cup of my heart is still,
And cold, and empty.

When you come, it brims
Red and trembling with blood,
Heart's blood for your drinking;
To fill your mouth with love
And the bitter-sweet taste of a soul.




















Emmy-Veronica-Sanders-Forty-Second-Street

Emmy Veronica Sanders - Forty-Second Street

I STAND and stare.
Peace is somewhere—
Peace of the big blue spaces …

Like fists, the brutal lights on white and weary faces
Fall fiercely through the livid air.      
A dull roar rises from the seething places
Where, cold-eyed slaves driven by cold-eyed masters,
Six million hunted beings dwell.
Six million shapes from a machine-made hell
Push past through filth and icy sleet,      
Push down and up and ever up and down
The Street.

God—rid me of these wan unholy faces!

I stand and stare.
Peace is somewhere—      
Peace of the big blue spaces …

Somewhere, far in the fells I know,
The aged pines, with heads bent low
And folded hands like solemn congregations,
Receive the silent sacrament of snow …      

Somewhere the stillness is so deep that you can hear
Planets and stars gliding through crystal spaces,
Clear burning in the frozen halls of time….

I stand and stare—
At this mad pushing of a million feet,      
At this wild thronging of the withered faces,
At this foul nightmare of
The Street.

Somewhere is Peace—
Peace of the wide blue spaces….
















Short Poetry Collection 153















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A Esperança - Augusto dos Anjos

Ismalia - Alphonsus de Guimaraens

Esta Velha - Álvaro de Campos (Heterónimo de Fernando Pessoa)

Espasmo - Mario de Andrade

Exaltação da Paz - Mario de Andrade

Uma lembrança - Emília Freitas

Contemplações - Cordélia Sylvia

Morte de Raquel - Madalena da Glória

Canção do exílio - Gonçalves Dias

Sóror Maria do Céu - Sobre as palavras do padre Vieira

Prece - Natalina Cordeiro

A Raposa e as Uvas - Manuel Maria Barbosa du Bocage

Luís Vaz de Camões - Apolo e as Nove Musas Descantando

Se tu viesses ver-me - Florbela Espanca

Que falta nesta cidade - Gregório de Matos

Flor da Mocidade - Machado de Assis

Velhas Árvores - Olavo Bilac

À Cidade da Bahia - Gregório de Matos

Siderações - Broquéis - João da Cruz e Sousa

A canção do africano - Os Escravos - Castro Alves

Agonia de um filósofo - Augusto dos Anjos - Eu e Outras Poesia

Tanto de Meu Estado me Acho Incerto - Soneto 04 - Luís Vaz de Camões

Robert Burns - A Red, Red Rose

Emile Verhaeren - A la Belgique

Ignacio Manuel Altamirano - Los Naranjos

Amor é fogo que arde sem se ver - Luís Vaz de Camões

TOP 20: PDF para Download - Domínio Público


Livros em PDF para Download

O Diário de Anne Frank - Edição Definitiva - Anne Frank

Mein Kampf - Adolf Hitler - Download PDF Livro Online

345 - Artur Azevedo - PDF

Eterna Mágoa - Augusto dos Anjos - Download

A Brasileira de Prazins - Camilo Castelo Branco - Download

A boa vista - Castro Alves - PDF

A Poesia Interminável - Cruz e Sousa - Livro Online

A Divina Comédia - Dante Alighieri - Livro Online

A capital - Eça de Queiros - PDF

À Margem Da História - Euclides da Cunha - PDF

A Hora do Diabo e outros contos - Fernando Pessoa - Livros em PDF para Download

Fiódor Mikhailovitch Dostoiévsk - Fedor Dostoievski - Livros em PDF para Download

Uma Criatura Dócil - Fiódor Mikhailovitch Dostoiévsk - Fedor Dostoievski

Ilíada - Homero - Download

Dublinenses - James Joyce - Download

A Abadia De Northanger - Jane Austen - Download PDF Livro Online

A Alma do Lázaro - José de Alencar

A Morte de Ivan Ilitch - Leon Tolstói - Download

Machado de Assis

O Alienista

Esaú e Jacó

Dom Casmurro

Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas

Quincas Borba

A Carteira - Machado de Assis - PDF Download Livro Online

A escrava que não é Isaura - Mário de Andrade - PDF Download Livro Online

Marcel Proust - Download PDF Livro Online

No Caminho de Swann – Em Busca do Tempo Perdido – Vol.1 - Marcel Proust

Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra - Download PDF Livro Online

Don Quixote. Vol. 1 - Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

A Defesa Nacional - Olavo Bilac - PDF Download Livro Online

14 de Julho na roça - Raul Pompeia - PDF Download Livro Online

Cartas Chilenas - Tomás Antônio Gonzaga - PDF Download Livro Online

Victor Hugo - Victor Hugo - PDF Download Livro Online

Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf - PDF

William Shakespeare

A Comédia dos Erros - William-Shakespeare - Livros em PDF para Download

Bíblia Sagrada - João Ferreira de Almeida - Bíblia

Bíblia Sagrada - Católica

Bucólicas - Virgilio

TOP 30: Billboard - Letras de Músicas - Song Lyrics - Songtext


Today - Brad Paisley

Kids - OneRepublic

Ain't My Fault - Zara Larsson

Million Reasons - Lady Gaga

PPAP (Pen-Pineapple-Apple-Pen) - Piko-Taro

All Time Low - Jon Bellion

Don't Wanna Know - Maroon 5 Featuring Kendrick Lamar

Love Me Now - John Legend

24K Magic - Bruno Mars

GooFresh Eyes - Andy Grammer - Song Lyrics

Wanna Be That Song - Brett Eldredge - Song Lyrics

Song For Another Time - Old Dominion - Song Lyrics

Goosebumps - Travis Scott - Song Lyrics

LIFTED - CL - Song Lyrics

Capsize - Frenship & Emily Warren - Song Lyrics

Don't Touch My Hair - Solange Featuring Sampha - Song Lyrics

Mercy - Shawn Mendes - Letras de Música

Juju On That Beat (TZ Anthem) - Zay Hilfigerrr & Zayion McCall - Letras de Música

Hold Up - Beyonce - Letras de Música

HandClap - Fitz And The Tantrums - Songtext

Key To The Streets - YFN Lucci feat Migos & Trouble - Letras de Música

Wishing - DJ Drama feat Chris Brown, Skeme & Lyquin - Letras de Música

Too Much Sauce - DJ ESCO feat Future & Lil Uzi Vert - Letras de Música

All We Know - The Chainsmokers feat Phoebe Ryan - Letras de Música

Sleep Without You - Brett Young - Letras de Música

A Little More Summertime - Jason Aldean - Letras de Música

I Know Somebody - LoCash - Letras de Música

False Alarm - The Weeknd - Letras de Música

Rock On - Tucker Beathard - Letras de Música

Say It - Flume feat Tove Lo - Letras de Música

This Town - Niall Horan - Letras de Música

Scars To Your Beautiful - Alessia Cara - Song Lyrics

I Met A Girl - William Michael Morgan - Song Lyrics

Perfect Illusion - Lady Gaga - Song Lyrics

Pick Up The Phone - Young Thug And Travis Scott Featuring Quavo - Song Lyrics

Forever Country - Artists Of Then, Now & Forever - Song Lyrics

In The Name Of Love - Martin Garrix & Bebe Rexha - Song Lyrics

OOOUUU - Young M.A - Song Lyrics

Black Beatles - Rae Sremmurd feat Gucci Mane - Letras de Música

Starboy - The Weeknd feat Daft Punk - Song Lyrics

Side To Side - Ariana Grande feat Nicki Minaj - Song Lyrics

My Way - Calvin Harris - Song Lyrics

The Greatest - Sia feat Kendrick Lamar - Song Lyrics

Don't Mind - Kent Jones - Song Lyrics

Can't Stop The Feeling! - Justin Timberlake - Song Lyrics

This Is What You Came - Calvin Harris Ft. Rihanna - Song Lyrics

Cranes In The Sky - Solange - Song Lyrics

Sit Still, Look Pretty - Daya - Song Lyrics

May We All - Florida Georgia Line feat Tim McGraw

X - 21 Savage & Metro Boomin feat Future - Song Lyrics

Caroline - Amine - Song Lyrics

Blue Ain't Your Color - Keith Urban - Song Lyrics

Fade - Kanye West - Song Lyrics

CRZY - Kehlani - Song Lyrics

All Eyez - The Game Featuring Jeremih - Song Lyrics

TOP 60: Conheça seu Estado - História e Geografia


As regiões do estado de Santa Catarina

Grande Florianópolis (Mesorregião)

Norte Catarinense (Mesorregião)

Oeste Catarinense (Mesorregião) (UP)

O espaço geográfico e sua organização

A organização do espaço geográfico brasileiro

Rio Tietê (Anhembi) - Um rio e muitas histórias

Recursos hídricos - Aquífero Guarani

Utilização dos recursos hídricos no estado de São Paulo

Bacias hidrográficas do estado de São Paulo

As águas do estado de São Paulo

O relevo do estado de São Paulo (DOWN)

As atividades econômicas do estado de São Paulo

Os imigrantes no século XIX e XX no estado do Paraná (DOWN-24)

A população atual do estado do Paraná

O crescimento populacional do estado do Paraná

Natureza e condições ambientais do Paraná

Biomas brasileiros

Preservação histórica e cultural (DOWN-26)

A preservação histórica e cultural do Mato Grosso do Sul

A formação da cultura do Mato Grosso do Sull

As atividades econômicas do Mato Grosso do Sul

Setor primário da economia do Mato Grosso do Sul

Atividades extrativistas do Mato Grosso do Sul

Setor secundário da economia do Mato Grosso do Sul

Setor terciário da economia do Mato Grosso do Sul

Turismo em Mato Grosso do Sul

As festas populares do estado de Mato Grosso do Sul

Carlos Drummond de Andrade – o poeta imortal

Tesouro líquido - GOTA-D’ÁGUA

Em busca da água que sustenta a vida

Com licença, por favor, obrigado(a)!

Fotografia - Um documento histórico

Organização do espaço urbano - necessidade ou arte?

Da pedra ao mármore

As fortalezas medievais

Diferentes culturas, diferentes estéticas

Arquitetura e estética no Brasil

Bailarina - Jogos para Crianças - Atividades Educativas Ensino Fundamental

Balão - Jogos para Crianças - Atividades Educativas Ensino Fundamental

Escova de dentes - Jogos para Crianças - Atividades Educativas Ensino Fundamental

Atividades Educativas Ensino Fundamental - Aprendendo sobre o Dinheiro

Curso de Inglês em 2 Horas - Aula 01 / 20 (Nível Básico)

Curso de Espanhol em 2 Horas - Aula 01 / 20 (Nível Básico)

Revisão de Inglês em 2 Horas - Aula 01 / 20 (Básico e Intermediário)

Progress 4GL - 0101 - Progress DCA - Parte 01

01-38 - SAP Business All-In-One and the Midmarket Approach

Crônica dos burros - Machado de Assis

Machado de Assis - Esaú e Jacó - 01 - Advertência, Capítulos 1 a 3

José de Alencar - Diva - Prefácio

Artur de Azevedo - 01 - A Conselho do Marido

Miss Dollar - Contos Fluminenses e Histórias da Meia-Noite - 01 - Machado de Assis

Contos de Eça de Queirós - 01 - Singularidades de uma rapariga loura, parte 1

Fiódor Dostoiévski - Um Club da Má Língua - Capítulo 01

Machado de Assis - Casa Velha - Capítulo 01

Camilo Castelo Branco - Amor de Perdição - Introdução

Euclides da Cunha - À Margem da História - Capítulo 01 - Impressões gerais

Eugênio Werneck - Antologia Brasileira - 00 - Duas Palavras, de Eugênio Werneck

Euclides da Cunha - Os Sertões - 01 / 49

Machado de Assis - O Alienista - 01 / 09

Lima Barreto - O Triste Fim de Policarpo Quaresma - 01 / 15

Machado de Assis - A Mão e a Luva - 01 / 19

Raul Pompeia - O Ateneu - 01 / 12

Olavo Bilac - Contos para Velhos - 01 / 16

José de Alencar - Cinco Minutos - 01 / 10

Demóstenes - Oração da Coroa - Parte 1

Lima Barreto - Contos - 01 / 20

Bíblia - Gênesis - 01 / 10

William Shakespeare - Hamlet - 01 / 05

Jane Austen - Pride and Prejudice - 01 / 61

William Shakespeare - Romeo and Juliet - 01 / 05

TOP 50: BLOG by Sanderlei Silveira


Biomas brasileiros - Santa Catarina - Conheça seu Estado (História e Geografia)

Idade das Religiões - História em 1 Minuto

As festas populares no estado de São Paulo - SP

O tropeirismo no estado do Paraná - PR

Pantanal – Patrimônio Natural da Humanidade - MS

Prédios mais altos do Mundo e do Brasil (Atualizado até 10/2016)

Os símbolos do estado do Rio de Janeiro - RJ

Poesia - Sanderlei Silveira

Canção do exílio - Gonçalves Dias

How Do I Love Thee? - Sonnet 43 - Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The Road Not Taken - Robert Frost - Poetry in English

24K Magic - Bruno Mars - Letra Música

POVO E RAÇA - Mein Kampf (Minha luta) - Adolf Hitler

Macunaíma - Mário de Andrade

Tendências de mercado - Economia em 1 Minuto

O navio negreiro - Os Escravos - Castro Alves

Antífona - Broquéis - João da Cruz e Sousa

Euclides da Cunha - Os Sertões (Áudio Livro)

A aia - Contos de Eça de Queirós

Diva - José de Alencar - Audiobook

Amor é fogo que arde sem se ver - Sonetos - Poemas de Amor - Luís Vaz de Camões

Versos íntimos - Augusto dos Anjos - Eu e Outras Poesias

Curso de Espanhol Online - Grátis e Completo

Curso de Inglês Online - Grátis e Completo

O Diário de Anne Frank

Casa Velha – Machado de Assis - Livros em PDF para Download (Domínio Público)

Introduction to Design Thinking with SAP - SAP - Course Free Online

Totvs - Datasul - Treinamento Online (Gratuito)

Mitología Griega - Historia en 1 Minuto

Religion - Ancient History - History in 1 Minute

Salmos 22 - Bíblia Online

Olavo Bilac - Contos para Velhos - Áudio Livro

A Doença do Fabrício - Contos - Artur de Azevedo

Contos - Lima Barreto - Áudio Livro - Audiobook

Jane Austen - Pride and Prejudice - AudioBook

Material de apoio para Pais e Professores - Educação Infantil - Nível 1 (crianças entre 4 a 6 anos)

Sala de Aula - Educação Infantil - Nível 2 (crianças entre 5 a 7 anos)

Brincadeira - Educação Infantil - Nível 3 (crianças entre 6 a 8 anos)

Idioma Português - Educação Infantil - Nível 4 (crianças entre 7 a 9 anos)

Rio São Francisco - Educação Infantil - Nível 5 (crianças entre 8 a 10 anos)

Livros - Educação Infantil - Nível 6 (crianças entre 9 a 11 anos)

MISS DOLLAR - Machado de Assis

Quincas Borba - Machado de Assis

Crisálidas - Poesia - Machado de Assis

TU SERÁS FELIZ, BENTINHO - Dom Casmurro

O ALIENISTA - Papéis Avulsos

EMBARGOS DE TERCEIRO - A Mão e a Luva

Tu, só tu, puro amor - Teatro - Machado de Assis

Cartas Fluminenses - Crônica - Machado de Assis

Helena - Machado de Assis

JOGO PERIGOSO - Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas - Machado de Assis

MELHOR DE DESCER QUE DE SUBIR - Esaú e Jacó - Machado de Assis


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